Endangered Species Day 14:
Name: Mountain Gorilla of the Congo Basin.Population: 880. The gorilla population increased from 620 animals in 1989.Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. This is one situation where conservation efforts have found success! Yay!Threat: Habitat Loss. Mountain Gorillas have thicker fur in order to withstand colder climates in the mountains. However, as people encroach into gorilla habitats, the gorillas are pushed further up the mountains, forcing them to withstand harsher conditions for a longer time. Mountain Gorillas are also susceptible to human diseases when they interact with people and can die from the common cold. 
All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 14:


Name: Mountain Gorilla of the Congo Basin.

Population: 880. The gorilla population increased from 620 animals in 1989.

Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered.
This is one situation where conservation efforts have found success! Yay!

Threat: Habitat Loss.
 Mountain Gorillas have thicker fur in order to withstand colder climates in the mountains. However, as people encroach into gorilla habitats, the gorillas are pushed further up the mountains, forcing them to withstand harsher conditions for a longer time. Mountain Gorillas are also susceptible to human diseases when they interact with people and can die from the common cold. 

All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 13:
Name: Sumatran Tiger of Borneo and Sumatra (Another Sumatra animal that is endangered…).Population: >400. They are the last of Indonesia’s tiger and may have the same fate as their extinct Javan and Balinese cousins, .Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. 40 tigers are killed yearly by poachers, making poachers responsible for 75% of tiger deaths.Threat: Poachers. Despite the fact that Indonesian has strict laws against poaching tigers, poaching rates have not decreased since 1990. They are also victims of habitat loss as a result of illegal timber harvesting.
All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 13:


Name: Sumatran Tiger of Borneo and Sumatra (Another Sumatra animal that is endangered…).

Population: >400. They are the last of Indonesia’s tiger and may have the same fate as their extinct Javan and Balinese cousins, .

Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. 
40 tigers are killed yearly by poachers, making poachers responsible for 75% of tiger deaths.

Threat: Poachers.
 Despite the fact that Indonesian has strict laws against poaching tigers, poaching rates have not decreased since 1990. They are also victims of habitat loss as a result of illegal timber harvesting.


All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 12:Name: Vaquita of the Gulf of California.Population: >200. Vaquitas are the world’s smallest porpoise and were only discovered in 1958. Not much is known about them as they are very elusive and swim away fro boats.Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. The Vaquita is the most endangered cetacean in the world and may go extinct without being protected.Threat: Bycatch. Because their population is already so low, even one Vaquita caught in a fishing net and drowning is one too many.
They’re super cool, with the black circles around their eyes and the black lining their mouths. Not only are there not many of them in the wild but there also isn’t a lot of pics of them online either :-/All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 12:

Name: Vaquita of the Gulf of California.

Population: >200. Vaquitas are the world’s smallest porpoise and were only discovered in 1958. Not much is known about them as they are very elusive and swim away fro boats.

Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. 
The Vaquita is the most endangered cetacean in the world and may go extinct without being protected.

Threat: Bycatch.
 Because their population is already so low, even one Vaquita caught in a fishing net and drowning is one too many.

They’re super cool, with the black circles around their eyes and the black lining their mouths. Not only are there not many of them in the wild but there also isn’t a lot of pics of them online either :-/

All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 11:Name: Leatherback Turtle of the Mesoamerican Reef, Coastal East Africa, Gulf of California, the Galápagos, and Coral Triangle.Population: Unknown. They are the largest sea turtle species and also one of the most migratory. They are called leather back because of the consistency of their shells, which are not hard like other turtle species.Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. Continually decreasing over the past 20 years.Threat: Egg Collection and Fisheries Bycatch. The turtles’ population has decreased because of illegal egg collection and trade, resulting in the local extinction of the species in Malaysia. Leatherbacks also get caught in fishing nets and drown. Their habitats have been polluted as well, causing some turtles to mistake trash bags for jellyfish, ingest them, and die.
Not another turtle species :( :(All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 11:

Name: Leatherback Turtle of the Mesoamerican Reef, Coastal East Africa, Gulf of California, the Galápagos, and Coral Triangle.

Population: Unknown. They are the largest sea turtle species and also one of the most migratory. They are called leather back because of the consistency of their shells, which are not hard like other turtle species.

Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. 
Continually decreasing over the past 20 years.

Threat: Egg Collection and Fisheries Bycatch.
 The turtles’ population has decreased because of illegal egg collection and trade, resulting in the local extinction of the species in Malaysia. Leatherbacks also get caught in fishing nets and drown. Their habitats have been polluted as well, causing some turtles to mistake trash bags for jellyfish, ingest them, and die.

Not another turtle species :( :(

All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 10:
Name: Sumatran Rhino of Borneo and Sumatra (Yes, this is like the third Sumatran animal on the list as of now).Population: Estimated around 100. The Sumatran Rhino compete over the most threatened rhino species with the Javan Rhino. 2 of the 3 Sumatran Rhino subspecies struggle to survive on the islands. The third is considered to be extinct.Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. Only 2 female rhinos have reproduced in captivity over the last 15 years.Threat: Poachers. The Sumatran Rhino is the only Asian Rhino with two horns, making it an ideal target for poachers since the demand for rhino horns has increased significantly (Vietnamese believe it cures cancer). They are also losing their habitats due to illegal coffee and rice plantations.
Have you ever seen the remains of a rhino after his horn has been chopped off? Its incredibly sad. See a pic here on the site fightforrhinos.com.All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 10:


Name: Sumatran Rhino of Borneo and Sumatra (Yes, this is like the third Sumatran animal on the list as of now).

Population: Estimated around 100. The Sumatran Rhino compete over the most threatened rhino species with the Javan Rhino. 2 of the 3 Sumatran Rhino subspecies struggle to survive on the islands. The third is considered to be extinct.

Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. 
Only 2 female rhinos have reproduced in captivity over the last 15 years.

Threat: Poachers.
 The Sumatran Rhino is the only Asian Rhino with two horns, making it an ideal target for poachers since the demand for rhino horns has increased significantly (Vietnamese believe it cures cancer). They are also losing their habitats due to illegal coffee and rice plantations.

Have you ever seen the remains of a rhino after his horn has been chopped off? Its incredibly sad. See a pic here on the site fightforrhinos.com.

All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 9:
Name: Western Lowland Gorilla of  Africa (Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and the Republic of Congo)
Population: Unknown. Gorillas live in remote, isolated swamps and rainforests and are hard to spot. The population has declined though by over 60% during the last 20 to 25 years. 
Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. Scientists have calculated that the population would require 75 years to recover, even if all the threats to them were removed.
Threat: Poaching and Disease. The deadly Ebola virus has been estimated to have killed off over 1 third of the entire gorilla population, mainly Western Lowland Gorillas. In the Minkébé Forest, it has killed 90% of the gorilla and chimpanzee population. Poachers kill 5% of lowland gorillas yearly in the Congo and spread the Ebola virus to both primates and humans through the handling of primate meat.
All facts from WWF. Non- top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 9:

Name: Western Lowland Gorilla of  Africa (Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and the Republic of Congo)

Population: Unknown. Gorillas live in remote, isolated swamps and rainforests and are hard to spot. The population has declined though by over 60% during the last 20 to 25 years. 

Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. Scientists have calculated that the population would require 75 years to recover, even if all the threats to them were removed.

Threat: Poaching and Disease. The deadly Ebola virus has been estimated to have killed off over 1 third of the entire gorilla population, mainly Western Lowland Gorillas. In the Minkébé Forest, it has killed 90% of the gorilla and chimpanzee population. Poachers kill 5% of lowland gorillas yearly in the Congo and spread the Ebola virus to both primates and humans through the handling of primate meat.

All facts from WWF. Non- top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 8:Name: Yangtze Finless Porpoise of the Yangtze River in China.Population: 1,000 – 1,800. These cute porpoises are known for their mischievous smiles and intelligence levels comparable to gorillas.Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. Its cousin, the Baiji Dolphin, in 2006, became the first dolphin species to be wiped out and declared as functionally extinct.Threat: Overfishing. The finless porpoises need an abundant supply of food that humans, by overfishing and polluting the river, are threatening.
These docile creatures actually CRY. Click here to view a picture of a crying, wounded porpoise who somehow is still smiling.All facts from WWF. Non- top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 8:

Name: Yangtze Finless Porpoise of the Yangtze River in China.

Population: 1,000 – 1,800. These cute porpoises are known for their mischievous smiles and intelligence levels comparable to gorillas.

Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. 
Its cousin, the Baiji Dolphin, in 2006, became the first dolphin species to be wiped out and declared as functionally extinct.

Threat: Overfishing.
 The finless porpoises need an abundant supply of food that humans, by overfishing and polluting the river, are threatening.

These docile creatures actually CRY. Click here to view a picture of a crying, wounded porpoise who somehow is still smiling.

All facts from WWF. Non- top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 7:Name: Sumatran Elephant of Sumatra, Indonesia.Population: 2,400 – 2,800. Elephant populations declined by 80% in less than 25 years.Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. In 2012, they went from Endangered to Critically Endangered.Threat: Agriculturers. Half the population has been lost in the past decade because nearly 70% of the elephant’s habitats has been destroyed in one generation. The males are hunted for their tusks and the elephants in general are often retaliated against when they unknowingly get pushed onto human territories.
This elephant was a victim of such human retaliation. I Photoshopped a chain out of this picture. Read what happened to this poor elephant, Raja, who was kept hostage here.All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 7:

Name: Sumatran Elephant of Sumatra, Indonesia.
Population: 2,400 – 2,800. Elephant populations declined by 80% in less than 25 years.
Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered. In 2012, they went from Endangered to Critically Endangered.
Threat: Agriculturers. Half the population has been lost in the past decade because nearly 70% of the elephant’s habitats has been destroyed in one generation. The males are hunted for their tusks and the elephants in general are often retaliated against when they unknowingly get pushed onto human territories.

This elephant was a victim of such human retaliation. I Photoshopped a chain out of this picture. Read what happened to this poor elephant, Raja, who was kept hostage here.

All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 6:Name: South China Tiger of well.. nowhere now.Population: Functionally Extinct. No one has spotted a South China Tiger in the wild for over 25 years.Extinction Risk: Critically EndangeredThreat: Hunters. Though China made it illegal, they were hunted as ‘pests’ and the population was reduced to 30-80 individuals. If any tigers were still in the wild, their habitat would not be able to sustain a tiger population. Good job, people.I literally gasped when I read that none exist in the wild anymore. We are monsters.
All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 6:

Name: South China Tiger of well.. nowhere now.
Population: Functionally Extinct. No one has spotted a South China Tiger in the wild for over 25 years.
Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered
Threat: Hunters. Though China made it illegal, they were hunted as ‘pests’ and the population was reduced to 30-80 individuals. If any tigers were still in the wild, their habitat would not be able to sustain a tiger population. Good job, people.

I literally gasped when I read that none exist in the wild anymore. We are monsters.

All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 5:Name: Saola (sow-la) of Greater Mekong (mainly Vietnam and Laos).Population: Unknown. It was only discovered in 1992!! How cool is that?! Its population is estimated to be a few hundred at most and a few dozen at the least.Extinction Risk: Critically EndangeredThreat: Agriculturers. Their habitats are being cleared for plantations and infrastructure. As with many of the other endangered species, they fall victim to traps set out for other animals, mainly wild boar, sambar or muntjac deer.I didn’t even know this animal existed and it’s already endangered. UGH. Happy New Years!
All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.

Endangered Species Day 5:

Name: Saola (sow-la) of Greater Mekong (mainly Vietnam and Laos).
Population: Unknown. It was only discovered in 1992!! How cool is that?! Its population is estimated to be a few hundred at most and a few dozen at the least.
Extinction Risk: Critically Endangered
Threat: Agriculturers. Their habitats are being cleared for plantations and infrastructure. As with many of the other endangered species, they fall victim to traps set out for other animals, mainly wild boar, sambar or muntjac deer.

I didn’t even know this animal existed and it’s already endangered. UGH. Happy New Years!

All facts from WWF. Non-top hat image taken from here.